WHY IS THE MAYOR HOSTING THESE MEETINGS?

Fulfilling a promise to learn more about the needs of Jacksonville citizens, Mayor Curry is convening stakeholders in a conversation about discrimination. While much debate and discussion have occurred throughout the country about sexual orientation and gender identity, the mayor has advised of his commitment to identifying and meeting the needs, gaps and opportunities for Jacksonville citizens.
 

WHAT IS HE PLANNING TO DO FOLLOWING THESE CONVERSATIONS?

The mayor plans to attend each of the Community Conversations being hosted throughout the city. He looks forward to learning from panelists and attendees and has no predetermined plans or conclusions.
 

HOW WERE THE TOPICS AND PANELISTS SELECTED?

The topics for the Community Conversations focus on key issue areas identified by groups that represent a wide spectrum of stakeholders throughout the community.
The panelists selected are local professionals who lead or serve businesses, faith communities and families and can contribute to conversations that identify gaps, needs and opportunities.
 

WHAT IS THE MAYOR’S POSITION ON THIS ISSUE?

Mayor Curry does not have a position and is committed to engaging with citizens to learn more about the issue of discrimination and to determine Jacksonville needs.
 

WHAT ARE THE CURRENT LAWS THAT PROHIBIT DISCRIMINATION IN DUVAL COUNTY?

There is an Ordinance Code the City of Jacksonville follows prohibiting discrimination in the areas of employment, public accommodations, and housing (Title XI, Chapters 400, 402, 406 and 408). The City also adheres to federal and state statutes that protect against discrimination. These laws protect individuals based on race, national origin, sex, age, disability, and familial status. Learn more on the Law & Ordinance page.

The City of Jacksonville established a Human Rights Commission more than 45 years ago to ensure that citizens have the opportunity to fully participate in the privileges of complete membership in the community and for taking action to eliminate discriminatory practices in Jacksonville. Learn more about the Human Rights Commission.
 

WHAT ARE THE MAYOR’S COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS ABOUT?

To promote dialogue among stakeholder groups, there are three Community Conversations. They include “Supporting the Needs and Well-Being of Families” on Nov. 17, “Religious Freedoms, Thoughts & Beliefs” on Dec. 3, and “Understanding the Law & Its Effects on Business” on Dec. 15.
 

WHEN/WHERE ARE THE CONVERSATIONS TAKING PLACE?

Nov. 17, 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
FSCJ Downtown Campus, Advanced Technology Center
401 W. State St., Room T-140
SUPPORTING THE NEEDS AND WELL-BEING OF FAMILIES
 

Dec.  3, 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Edward Waters College Adams - Jenkins Music & Sports Center
1859 Kings Road
RELIGIOUS FREEDOMS, THOUGHTS & BELIEFS
 

Dec. 15, 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville University Terry Concert Hall
2800 University Blvd. N. 
UNDERSTANDING THE LAW & ITS EFFECTS ON BUSINESS
 

WILL THE PUBLIC BE ALLOWED TO SPEAK?

Yes; there will be a time for questions from the public following the panel discussions.
 

WHAT IS THE HRO?

HRO is an acronym for Human Rights Ordinance, which refers to proposed legislation (2012-296) that was considered by the Jacksonville City Council in 2012. It sought to include sexual orientation and gender identity/expression as a protected category in local anti-discrimination laws in the areas of employment, housing, and public accommodations. Learn more on the Law & Ordinance page.
 

WHERE HAS A SIMILAR LAW GONE INTO EFFECT?

The City of Jacksonville does not currently have sexual orientation and gender identity/expression as protected categories in its anti-discrimination laws. There are more than 200 cities and counties which prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity/expression, including the cities of Atlantic Beach, Tampa, Orlando and West Palm Beach. Learn more from this report developed by the Office of General Counsel.
 

HOW DOES THIS AFFECT ME?

HRO legislation, if drafted and passed by the Jacksonville City Council, would prevent employers from discriminating against individuals in the areas of employment, housing, and public accommodations based on sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. Organizations that have fewer than 15 employees or are religious institutions would be exempt under the most recent version of the law. Learn more on the Law & Ordinance page.