IT Accessibility Symposium Flyer

Tuesday, August 23, 2022
9:00 am – 3:30 pm

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REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED

Sessions

Digital Access: Break I.T. (2.5 hours)

Description: 

Ensuring digital access in programs, training, and media (online and print), is integral for inclusive service delivery and effective communication. But, "missing pieces" prevent equality for people with disabilities. Break "I.T." down starting with the basic "corners" of rationale, lingo, laws, and guidelines for digital access. "Edge" into the online experience of people, disability, and technology. Discover best practices to “barriers” in digital access and practical solutions to provide more accessible materials to a diverse audience.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify three basic concepts of digital access to integrate in planning, policy, programming and service delivery.
  • Outline three examples of best practices to promote digital access in planning, policy, programming and service delivery.
  • Describe three tools and/or techniques to evaluate digital access of materials in planning, policy, programming and service delivery

Presentation Methods

  • Lecture, examples and discussion of the basics (why?, common terms, legal, guidelines), background (user experience), and best practices in digital access (including social media, accessible materials, policy).
  • Interactive small group exercises in breaking "I.T" down by identifying and assembling the "pieces" of the digital access puzzle -- basic "corners" , background "edges" of user experience, best practices for "content."
  • Experiential videos and simulations of the digital experience for people with disabilities plus practical techniques and tools to evaluate accessibility and maximize usability.

Audience Experience Level: 

Beginner

Digital Access Workshop: Start to Finish (3 hours)

Description: 

Digital access needs to planned and included from the start. Trillions of files are on the Web and many are vitally integral for
information, application, and participation in programming and service delivery. The PDF file, short for Portable Document Format, is the most commonly used for printable documents. But, various barriers often prevent effective communication and limit equal access for people with disabilities. The secret to creating an accessible file is to build accessibility into the source document and well before any PDF file is created. Come gain an understanding of the best practices with a hands-on opportunity to create and check file accessibility. Walk away with resources to help you promote and provide accessible files to a diverse audience, the community, and within your organization.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify three basic concepts of accessibility to implement in the source file and when creating a PDF file.
  • Outline three examples of best practices to promote file access in planning, policy, programming and service delivery.
  • Describe three tools and/or techniques to evaluate digital access of files in planning, policy, programming and service delivery.

Presentation Methods

  • Lecture, discussion and demo of best practices of creating an accessible file starting from common sources such as: Word, PPT and including features such as: image, table, headings, links, etc.
  • Interactive exercises in stepping through the process and tools to check access in files such as: Word, PPT, PDF.
  • Interactive exercises in stepping through the process and tools to “basic” check a webpage for access.
  • Examples and resources for accessibility in other source formats and file types.

Audience Experience Level: 

Beginner

Supplies Needed: 

Participants should bring a laptop with Windows, Office 365, and Adobe Acrobat Pro.

Presenters

Marsha Schwanke, Southeast ADA Center

Marsha has been a web access specialist since 2000 for the Southeast ADA Center, a project of the Burton Blatt Institute (BBI) at Syracuse University. She is also a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) with over 30 years’ experience working with people with disabilities and has authored and facilitated numerous presentations and trainings on disability awareness, web accessibility, and assistive technology.

Southeast ADA Center

The Southeast ADA Center provides information, training and technical assistance for eight states in the U.S. Southeast Region. We are funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), and one of ten regional centers that provide guidance, publications, research, and training on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).



Accommodations for persons with disabilities are available upon request. Please allow 2-3 business days’ notification to process; last-minute requests will be accepted but may not be possible to fulfill. Please contact Disabled Services at VM 255-5466, TTY 255-5475, or email your request to KaraT@coj.net