Blog Posts

On July 15, Mayor Lenny Curry presented his sixth budget to the Jacksonville City Council via a Zoom Conference call. 
Trust is vital for the successful operation of any public entity. That’s includes JEA. Rebuilding that trust is going to be a top priority for the seven community leaders I am recommending for appointment to the JEA Board of Directors.
 
Today, I stood with City Councilman Ron Salem, Daily's CEO Aubrey Edge and other community leaders to  announce a new effort to address a serious issue facing our city’s youth. 
As Jacksonville prepares for the Thanksgiving holiday, I met with Councilwoman and CEO/president of the Clara White Mission, Ju'Coby Pittman, to film the third in a series of interviews with interesting citizens of Jacksonville. 
Earlier this month, I sat down for lunch at Fred Cotten's Landmark Bar-B-Que with a true Jacksonville institution: radio and television legend Robbie Rose. 
Today, I joined military service members and leaders from our thriving business community for JAX Chamber's 17th Annual Military Appreciation Luncheon honoring our strong military and veteran community in Northeast Florida. 
As mayor, I am privileged to lead an amazing team of City employees that are dedicated to improving our community. Recently, I joined a crew from our Right of Way & Storm water Maintenance Division to repair sidewalks in a Northwest Jacksonville neighborhood. 
Last night, the Jacksonville City Council approved my budget for the City of Jacksonville with an overwhelming majority. This morning, I met with members of the Riverside Rotary Club to discuss my budget and priorities for Jacksonville in the next four years. 
Earlier this year, when I said that you won't recognize Dowtnown Jacksonville in four years, I meant it. I believe that our downtown is the heart of the city and that we need a vibrant, growing core to help grow the entire community.
A little over two years ago, I convened a team of experts and service providers and charged them with an important task: explore the best options and offerings to end homelessness in Jacksonville.
 
Earlier this month, our city witnessed the implosion of the Old City Hall Annex building on Bay Street.
 
“Four years will be gone in the blink of an eye.” That was a line in the inaugural address I delivered over three years ago.
 
As an annual tradition, my family and I volunteer and hand out gifts at the Children’s Christmas Party of Jacksonville.
Last week, I joined residents and new owners of the former Eureka Gardens to break ground on a new era of hope for the long-troubled housing complex.
 
Every November, as our nation pauses to honor the men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces, I think about the men in my family who served our great nation.
It was a little over a year ago when I joined City Council members in a classroom to sign legislation creating the Kids Hope Alliance (KHA). I still remember the sign over the whiteboard that read, “No Slacking Any Time.”
 
In 1960, Mayor-Commissioner Haydon Burns sealed a time capsule filled with Jacksonville history. City Council President Aaron Bowman and I had the pleasure to open the time capsule as part of a week-long set of activities to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Jacksonville’s Consolidation.
Last Tuesday, my fourth budget was unanimously approved by my colleagues on City Council.
I recently had the opportunity to join former mayors of Jacksonville during a special forum hosted by Jacksonville University and WJXT.
 
I recently had the honor of attending a membership luncheon for the Jacksonville Bar Association where I presented a proclamation to celebrate Pro Bono Week in Jacksonville.
 
Recently, City Council Vice-President Scott Wilson and I joined a team from our Public Works Department to repair a road cave-in in the Beachwood community.
 
Earlier this year, I shared my thoughts about turning downtown’s potential into action. The recently released 2017 State of Downtown Report demonstrates these actions.
 
This week, I presented my fourth budget as mayor of Jacksonville.
Friday brought good news to youth-serving organizations throughout Jacksonville.
 
Jacksonville is a proud and patriotic city. You could see that reflected in the faces of the thousands of citizens who came downtown to watch the annual July 4th fireworks display.
 
“All gave some. Some gave all.”
 
This simple phrase is a powerful reminder of the sacrifices made by the men and women of our military.
 
A solemn duty I face as mayor is the responsibility of helping our city honor our fallen heroes.
I came to Jacksonville the same way many people in our city did – through the Navy.
Our first responders have a difficult job. They respond to tragic events and scenes – car accidents, house fires, and medical emergencies – often multiple times per day. Bearing witness to that level of trauma isn’t easy.
Last week, I had the opportunity to meet and spend time with the “Steiners” – a group of promising students from the University of North Florida.
 
City Councilman Al Ferraro and I were privileged to spend some time with an amazing group of men on Wednesday. We joined a Public Works crew conducting pothole repairs along Whittaker Road on the northside.
Last week, I joined the Jacksonville University community to announce the Master in Public Policy Minority Fellowship program, and it was an honor to be included in a monumental moment that will benefit the City of Jacksonville in the many years to come.
 
As individuals, we might not believe that we can change the world by ourselves; but if we all make a conscious effort to have a positive impact in at least one person’s life, we are well on our way.
My family and I couldn’t imagine our lives without Blake and B. Those faces you see in that photo greet us every day, reminding us of the special bond and incredible love only pets can provide.   
 
For too long, Jacksonville has been described as a city with “great potential.” It’s time to turn that great potential into actions that produce great results for our citizens and communities.
 
While I’m not thrilled about how the AFC Championship game played out, I’m blocking my hurt and thinking about the guys that played the game.
 
Too many kids in Jacksonville are facing hopelessness. In the past two and a half years, I’ve had the pleasure of speaking with some incredible young people. But some of these same kids have faced unfathomable hardship; they have dealt with a friend being shot, seen a parent incarcerated, or struggled with homelessness.
 
Success is built on getting the right talent together around a common vision, putting in the time and preparation, and executing the plan. The Jaguars are leveraging these principles into a winning season, earning support and generating enthusiasm all over the city.
 
Each week, I issue birthday and anniversary letters to citizens, celebrating the milestones they’ve reached in their lives or their organizations. Last week was incredibly special in that I was afforded and opportunity to recognize a long-time anchor in the community.
Jacksonville is well known for taking bold steps. That also rings true for the Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department (JFRD).
There was a sign on the wall, just above the whiteboard, in the classroom at Daniel Academy where I signed the Kids Hope Alliance (KHA) legislation into law. It read, “No Slacking Any Time.”
 
Earlier this month, I met a future leader in our community. Her name is Alexandria Andrade, and she’s a rising 5th grader at Sallye Mathis Elementary School. 

Having been a CPA, I’ve long known that budgets are about priorities. You can tell a lot about what an organization cares about by how it allocates resources. 
Edward Waters College (EWC) should be a beacon of light for our community. Not just because of its historic significance, but because of its many valuable contributions to our city. Today, we announced plans to strengthen those contributions.
If you follow me on Twitter, you know I occasionally share motivational quotes. One of my favorites is from Tony Robbins: “The path to success is to take massive determined action.”
How many of you remember Jacksonville’s old tagline, The Bold New City of the South? While I was not a city resident at the time, I am certainly inspired by the bold history and legacy it represented.